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Snow Blower Safety Tips in New Providence, PA

Winter is still hanging on! Do you know how to use your snow blower safely? Follow these Safety Tips to blow snow more efficiently and safely. Following these tips can help you blow snow more efficiently and safely:


·      Don’t wear clothing that dangles and can get caught in a snow blower’s moving parts.

·      Before you start using a snow blower, remove impediments such as wires and newspapers that can clog or damage the machine.

·      When your area has had several inches of accumulated wet snow, you may experience issues with your snow blower clogging. When snow clogs the machine, it’s important that you NOT try to fix it using your fingers/hand. Most people think right after they turn the machine off, the blades won’t rotate. WRONG! In fact, each year statistics show hundreds of people suffers from finger and hand injuries due to improper snow blower handling.  Honda two stage snow blowers include a special declogging tool. Always use it to unclog your snow blower!

·      Gas-powered snow blowers can create carbon monoxide poisoning if the area isn’t properly ventilated. So stay away from enclosed areas such as a garage or shed when you start and run this type of snow blower.

·      When using an HS720 snow blower with electric start, be sure you have an approved outdoor extension cord for your model and connect it to a properly grounded outlet.

·      If it’s extremely cold outside, take frequents breaks to avoid excessive physical exertion that can cause health issues.


Remember all snow blowers aren’t equal as it pertains to steering and control, blower diameter for increased snow removal speed, serrated ice breaking augers, distance control mechanisms and snow throwing capacity/distance to name a few.


Resource Rentals & Sales, Inc., 2202 Beaver Valley Pike New Providence, PA 17560-9300, (717) 786-2221 is here to answer your questions and help with your snow blower needs.

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Generator Safety

Customer safety is extremely important to Resource Rentals & Sales, Inc. and that’s why we want to encourage discussions about generator safety. All too often, we hear about preventable deaths when generator safety isn’t a high priority, resulting in Carbon Monoxide (CO) poisoning. In fact about 170 people in the U.S. die every year from CO produced by non-automotive consumer products.  


These products include Honda’s engine powered equipment such as generators for the construction and rental industries, backup power during outages, camping equipment and other outdoor events. CO is a deadly, colorless, odorless and can kill within minutes.


Resource Rentals & Sales, Inc. wants you to be safe. Many people don’t know the only safe place to have a generator is outdoors, away from doors and windows. In closed areas, even with open doors and windows, these spaces can trap CO and allow it to quickly build to lethal levels. So we need to learn and share how to practice generator safety.


Did you know generators …

·   Exhaust contains toxic CO.

·   Connected to a building improperly could allow electrical current to feed back into utility lines, creating an electrocution hazard for utility workers.

·   Using a generator with wet hands or in wet conditions could result in electrocution.

·   Run on gasoline and to avoid explosive situations, don’t refuel while the engine is hot and running and keep flammables away from the generator when it’s running.

·   Become very hot during operation and remain hot for a while after the engine stops. Be careful not to touch the muffler while it is hot, and let the engine cool before storing the generator indoors.


CO initial symptoms are similar to the flu (without the fever), shortness of breath, nausea and dizziness. Higher level symptoms of CO poisoning include mental confusion, vomiting, loss of muscular coordination and consciousness and death. If you think you have been exposed to toxic levels of CO, get outside immediately for fresh air, call 911 and tell them you suspect you’ve been exposed to CO poisoning. This winter, Resource Rentals & Sales, Inc. wants us all to be safer by telling our family and friends about CO dangers and how we can avoid catastrophes. Consider purchasing CO detectors as gifts for ourselves and loved ones. We definitely want to read our generator manuals and encourage others to read them too and share the information, and take time to review generator labels for more safety specifics.


Resource Rentals & Sales, Inc., 2202 Beaver Valley Pike New Providence, PA 17560-9300, (717) 786-2221 is here to answer your questions and help with your generator needs.

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Choosing A Honda Generator in New Providence, PA

As winter continues to grip a good part of our country and the weather remains unpredictable, you never know when a generator might come in handy. If the area you live in has frequent power outages, buying a generator might be a good investment and relieve some stress.


Many of us don’t think about the need for a generator until we experience a power failure. Then all kinds of issues arise, including the inability to heat or cool our home, spoiled food in the refrigerator and freezer, inoperable medical equipment, charging your cell phone, and more. 




When choosing a generator, you will want to consider the following:


•      Decide on the size of the generator you need. Keep in mind, many people can use a small generator like the EU2200i to power their fridge, lights, TV, and other critical essentials during outages. If you need to power your well pump, you’ll need to go with a larger model, like the EM5000. Honda has a great tool to help you calculate the wattage you need. https://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/wattage-calculator


•      Decide if the generator will be used as an emergency backup at home or during outdoor activities. If you are interested in using it for more than just emergency back up, consider an EU series generator, which is very versatile and perfect for recreational activities as well as home power.


A couple of safety issues to be aware of when using generators are carbon monoxide and electrocution. Carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless and kills people every year, while sending others to the emergency room. Generators belong outside and should never be run in a basement or garage, even if windows or doors are open. Always consult your owner’s manual for other safety concerns and more information.

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